News Ticker

Healthy sex life leads to better job satisfaction, study reports

A new study shows that people who have healthy sex lives at home tend to be more productive and happy at their jobs. naghtigall / Pixabay

Researchers from Oregon State University have found that workers who have an active sex life are more likely to be happier and more productive at work, a new study published in The Journal of Management reports.

The team analyzed 159 married employees every day over a two-week period. This revealed that people who had sex tend to be more engaged with their tasks and be more likely to enjoy their work the next day. This trend was the same for both men and women.

“We make jokes about people having a ‘spring in their step,’ but it turns out this is actually a real thing and we should pay attention to it,” said study lead author Keith Leavitt, an associate professor at Oregon State University, in a statement. “Maintaining a healthy relationship that includes a healthy sex life will help employees stay happy and engaged in their work, which benefits the employees and the organizations they work for.”

The team also discovered that bringing home job-related stresses can negatively impact a person’s sex life. Smart phones and other electronics make it easy to take work home, keeping people focused on their job even when they are not at the office, Tech Times reports. When this happens, it can lead people to sacrifice personal activities — such as sex — which causes daily strain to build up and hurts job performance, creating a negative feedback loop.

People who have sex see the beneficial effects typically last for at least 24 hours. This makes sense because sexual activity triggers the release of dopamine and engages the brain’s reward centers. It also leads to the release of oxytocin, a neuropeptide linked to feelings of attachment and social bonding. 

These reactions explain why sex is a natural mood booster and give insight into why the benefits can extend well into the next day.

“This is a reminder that sex has social, emotional and physiological benefits,” added Leavitt. “Making a more intentional effort to maintain a healthy sex life should be considered an issue of human sustainability, and as a result, a potential career advantage.”

Joseph Scalise

Joseph Scalise

Staff Writer
Joseph Scalise is an experienced writer who has worked for many different online websites across many different mediums. While his background is mainly rooted in sports writing, he has also written and edited guides, ebooks, short stories and screenplays. In addition, he performs and writes poetry, and has won numerous contests. Joseph is a dedicated writer, sports lover and avid reader who covers all different topics, ranging from space exploration to his personal favorite science, microbiology.
About Joseph Scalise (1733 Articles)
Joseph Scalise is an experienced writer who has worked for many different online websites across many different mediums. While his background is mainly rooted in sports writing, he has also written and edited guides, ebooks, short stories and screenplays. In addition, he performs and writes poetry, and has won numerous contests. Joseph is a dedicated writer, sports lover and avid reader who covers all different topics, ranging from space exploration to his personal favorite science, microbiology.