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Top science stories of the week, Nov. 16-Nov. 22

Top stories of the week in 5 minutes.

Here is a summary of the five most popular science stories appearing this week in Science Recorder (Nov. 16-Nov. 22). Enjoy!

Aquarium fishing as big a problem as coral bleaching

While the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources is putting a new coral reef management plan into effect, many people are saying it does not go far enough.

Some are calling for an emergency moratorium on fishing for the profitable aquarium market, saying the state’s Kona Coast supplies nearly 70 percent of all aquarium fish caught near the islands. This is because aquarium fish, which are herbivores, help keep coral reefs free of the algae that damage them.

New flying pterosaur discovered in Texas

A newly found fossil of a winged pterosaur was recently discovered in northern Texas. The find is important because evidence of ancient pterosaurs in North America is rare.

The researchers says that the close relationship between pterosaurs from Texas and those found in England suggest that the creatures were able to spread to different parts of the globe even as the continents were drifting further apart.

Songbirds tap dance to impress potential mates

A new study has uncovered a previously unknown secret about songbird behavior: They tap dance when flirting with potential mates.

Researchers used high-speed cameras to detect the birds’ fancy footwork, which is otherwise invisible to humans. They found that both males and females perform courtship displays with equal skill.

Declining snowpacks could lead to future water crisis

A new study finds that declining snow deposits in the Northern Hemisphere could lead to a widespread water crisis affecting more than 2 billion people. The reduced snowpacks around the world are caused by continually increasing global temperatures.

Researchers also believe the snowpack reduction could lead to more forest fires, the destruction of important ecosystems, and reduce access to clean water in under-developed countries.

‘Dead’ galaxy may contain unprecedented amount of dark matter

Astronomers have stumbled upon a strange anomaly: A nearby dwarf galaxy that appears to contain one of the largest concentrations of dark matter ever recorded.

Dark matter particles make up some 85 percent of the matter in universe and interact with normal matter only by means gravitational force.

Delila James

Delila James

Associate Editor/Writer
Delila James practiced civil rights and employment law for almost 20 years. Before going to law school, she raised organic lamb on a ranch in the Sierra Nevada foothills, ran a dairy farm in Muscoda, WI, and then owned a popular live music nightclub in Madison, WI. She has a Master's degree in the History of Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she went to law school. She also is a published poet. She now is a book editor, writes legal blogs, and is trying to finish a book. She has been writing for Science Recorder since March, 2013.
About Delila James (1321 Articles)
Delila James practiced civil rights and employment law for almost 20 years. Before going to law school, she raised organic lamb on a ranch in the Sierra Nevada foothills, ran a dairy farm in Muscoda, WI, and then owned a popular live music nightclub in Madison, WI. She has a Master's degree in the History of Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she went to law school. She also is a published poet. She now is a book editor, writes legal blogs, and is trying to finish a book. She has been writing for Science Recorder since March, 2013.