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Study reveals how Tetris can actually reduce your addiction cravings

New research finds that playing Tetris on a smartphone for as little as three minutes can weaken cravings for drugs, food and activities such as sex and sleeping by as much as one-fifth. Photo Credit: JESS LEE

In a most unusual discovery, researchers from the Plymouth University’s School of Psychology and Cognition Institute have just proven that Tetris can somehow block off your urgent desires. This goes for not just typical food and drugs, but even for pleasurable activities in life that people participate in including sleep and sex.

The researchers analyzed data from outside laboratory settings to determine the levels of cravings people have, as well as their attentiveness to play the puzzle game while shifting their attention away during random times of the day.

Professor Jackie Andrade of the University says, “Playing a visually interesting game like Tetris occupies the mental processes that support that imagery; it is hard to imagine something vividly and play Tetris at the same time.”

Andrade goes on to explain that they believe this ‘Tetris effect’ is as effective as it is because craving involves imagining the experience of consuming a substance or indulging in a certain activity, to which playing Tetris is just occupying too much of the brain already as it is.

The study enrolled 31 undergraduates to participate. They were given notice every day for seven days to record any cravings they have during the day after playing Tetris. Of the findings from this study showed that playing Tetris decreased the craving for drugs, food, and other activities from 70 to 56 percent.

Among these addiction types, most of the participants craved non-alcoholic drinks and food while others were recorded to have cravings for drugs, alcoholic beverages, and coffee.

Professor Jon May also from Plymouth University goes on to state that the effects of playing Tetris remained consistent throughout the week on all addictive craving types. People played the game on an average of 40 times but the effects did not seem to wear off as he and the researchers concluded.

Sid Motaghi

Sid Motaghi

Staff Writer
Sid Motaghi has a B.F.A. in Film and a M.A. in Media Studies from The New School. He is now a contributing writer on Science Recorder, Moviepilot, and Study of Anime from time to time. He is also into screenwriting and creative writing, now writing a few short stories to supplement his screenplay and graphic novel he is currently working on.
About Sid Motaghi (22 Articles)
Sid Motaghi has a B.F.A. in Film and a M.A. in Media Studies from The New School. He is now a contributing writer on Science Recorder, Moviepilot, and Study of Anime from time to time. He is also into screenwriting and creative writing, now writing a few short stories to supplement his screenplay and graphic novel he is currently working on.
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