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Researchers produce graphene nanoribbons with nanopores for fast DNA sequencing

Jonathan Marker | Science Recorder | November 18, 2013

Researchers produce graphene nanoribbons with nanopores for fast DNA sequencing

The new DNA sensor uses graphene, a lattice of carbon roughly the thickness of an atom.

According to a November 14 news release from Penn State University, researchers have paved the way for a new gene sequencing technique that is based on threading the 3 billion letter-long DNA sequences unique to each and every human through a tiny hole and using a nearby sensor to read each letter as it passes through.

The new DNA sensor uses graphene, a lattice of carbon roughly the thickness of an atom.  While earlier iterations of the technique leveraged graphene’s unparalleled thinness, the University of Pennsylvania research team shows how the Nobel Prize-wining material’s unique electrical properties may be used to produce faster and more sensitive gene sequencing machines.

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