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Researchers: Interbreeding may have been underestimated in the human fossil record

Ross Cronkrite | Science Recorder | December 08, 2012

Researchers: Interbreeding may have been underestimated in the human fossil record

Researchers at the University of Michigan learn more about the role of interbreeding in human evolution.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have learned more about the role of interbreeding in human evolution. According to U-M, researchers have spent years trying to answer a rather complex question: Did different species of early humans interbreed and produce offspring of mixed ancestry? Unfortunately, answering this question is not a straight forward or easy process.

Geneticists believe, based on recent studies, that Neanderthals may have had sex with modern humans tens of thousands of years ago in the Middle East, adding to the modern human gene pool. According to LiveScience, when scientists finished sequencing the Neanderthal genome in 2010, they announced that some modern humans’ DNA came from the early humans.

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