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New graphene camera sensor is 1000 times more sensitive to light

June 03, 2013

New graphene camera sensor is 1000 times more sensitive to light

It also utilizes about 10 times less energy than current technology.

While cameras today still rely on ultrapixels and OIS to take sharp photographs, researchers in Singapore have identified a game changer for the world of photography. Graphene, both incredibly strong and electrically conductive, contains the ability to absorb light over a broad range of wavelengths. In fact, graphene’s response to light makes it an ideal material for camera sensors, according to Extreme Tech.

Researchers based at the Nanyang Technological University have developed an image sensor out of graphene that is “1,000 times more sensitive [to light] than current camera sensors.” It also utilizes about 10 times less energy than current technology. To create the graphene sensor, the research team created a transistor with a graphene monolayer channel, which they covered with layers of titanium. After scratching some of the titanium away, graphene quantum dot-like (GQD) structures remain. The GQD structures act as the photo detector. Researchers posit that the new detector would allow for clearer low-light images.

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