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Graphene paint, just one atom thick, could power homes of the future

Delila James | Science Recorder | May 04, 2013

Graphene paint, just one atom thick, could power homes of the future

A new super-slim paint could power homes of the future.

Scientists have found a way to use thin slices of graphene to convert solar energy to direct current electricity. The discovery could lead to a whole array of new applications, including a whole new method of creating a sustainable energy source to power buildings of the future.

Graphene is a material made up of a single layer of carbon atoms arranged like a honeycomb. Discovered in 2004 by Professors Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov, graphene is extracted from graphite, like that found in lead pencils. It is the strongest, thinnest, most conductive material known to science and has led to a wide variety of applications, from medical to smart phones to computer chips. Geim and Novoselov won the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics for their discovery.

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