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NASA captures stunning video of massive solar flare

The Mar. 29, 2014 solar flare was one of the most intense ever observed, NASA officials say. These storms, occurring on the surface of the sun, are explosions that release the energy of millions of hydrogen bombs.

Using a myriad of observatories across the world, NASA captured the explosion in unprecedented detail. The information obtained by the space agency could lead to a better understanding of what induces these eruptions and how scientists can better anticipate the likelihood of radio blackouts on Earth.

These solar flares occur when clouds of plasma are released by the sun into space at a speed of more than one million miles per hour. Therefore, their effects can cause significant damage if they reach Earth, disrupting the planet’s magnetic fields. At the moment, there are few devices that monitor solar activity directly.

Now, by combining data from NASA’s  Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), astronomers in the future may determine the most efficient way to orchestrate testing and predicting their occurrence.

James Sullivan

James Sullivan

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James Sullivan is a contributing writer at Science Recorder, OMNI Reboot, and Brain World magazine.
About James Sullivan (614 Articles)
James Sullivan is a contributing writer at Science Recorder, OMNI Reboot, and Brain World magazine.

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