Unhackable Credit Cards? 'Quantum encryption' may be the key
Unhackable Credit Cards? 'Quantum encryption' may be the key
Hackers typically just rip off information stored in a credit card and copy it; that would be impossible with quantum encryption.
Evidence suggests that dinosaurs were likely killed by volcanoes, not an asteroid
Evidence suggests that dinosaurs were likely killed by volcanoes, not an asteroid
For approximately 150 million years, dinosaurs dominated the Earth until they vanished 65 million years ago; scientists have found recent evidence for 'why.'
Geminid meteor shower promises a great show: Here's how to watch
Geminid meteor shower promises a great show: Here's how to watch
Up to 60 shooting stars per hour are expected to be seen this year in one of the most spectacular events in the astronomical calendar.
IPCC: A whopping $500 billion will be needed annually by 2050 to adapt to climate change
IPCC: A whopping $500 billion will be needed annually by 2050 to adapt to climate change
The IPCC says their figures assume that the world is successful in keeping a global rise in temperatures below 2 degrees Celsius -- otherwise, figures will have to be revised even higher.
Confirmed: Curiosity rover discovers organic matter on Mars
Angelo Sayo - 5 hours ago
NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has detected organic chemicals in the atmosphere and in rock-powder samples on Mars, marking the first confirmed findings of organic material on the planet.
 
Why is this rock containing 30,000 'perfect' diamonds virtually worthless?
Angelo Sayo - 7 hours ago
The rock was unearthed at ALROSA's Udachnaya in Russia.
 
Signs of life? Philae lander finds organic molecules on comet 67P
Joe Chivers - 7 hours ago
The image was taken shortly after the lander's first bounce following touch-down.
 
Venus Express set for fiery demise as fuel runs out: What has it found?
Delila Ledwith - 9 hours ago
In a major discovery, the ESA's Venus Express mission found evidence that Venus may still be geologically active.
 
Mars rover Curiosity beams down one stunning discovery after another
Delila Ledwith - 9 hours ago
As Curiosity rover continues to explore Mount Sharp, it will continue to sniff the air for additional signs of methane--a gas that on Earth is strongly associated with living organisms.
 
Deep sea snail named after Clash legend Joe Strummer
Joseph Scalise - 12 hours ago
A new deep sea snail, due to its spiky appearance and the harsh condition under which it lives, has been named after punk icon Joe Strummer.
 
Moon rover "Andy" helps Team Astrobiotic net Google's $750,000 XPrize award
Joseph Scalise - 13 hours ago
In accordance with Google's $30 million Lunar XPrize Competition, XPrize has just handed out their first "milestone prize" award of $750,000 to Team Astrobiotic.
 
Robo-tuna: U.S. Navy's newest underwater spy drone
Delila Ledwith - 16 hours ago
Robotic tuna fish, designed for espionage, can move quietly, make tight turns, and is virtually undetectable.
 
Unhackable Credit Cards? 'Quantum encryption' may be the key
Dan Taylor - 20 hours ago
Hackers typically just rip off information stored in a credit card and copy it; that would be impossible with quantum encryption.
 
Want to name one of Mercury's craters? Now's your chance
Dan Taylor - 23 hours ago
MESSENGER is reaching the end of its life, and scientists are hoping to bring attention to the important work it has done in mapping out the entire surface of the planet.
 
Astronomers witness bizarre phenomenon: planets 'squished' by stars
Angelo Sayo - Dec 17, 2014
New research shows that rocky exoplanets near red dwarf planets may be easier to detect during transit events due to the planets' gravitationally locked rotations.
 
Researchers find magic ingredient that keeps Roman monuments so durable
Angelo Sayo - Dec 17, 2014
Analysis of 1,900-year-old Roman concrete samples from Trajan's Market shows that crystalline binding has prevented microcracks from forming through the years.
 
BioScapes competition has breathtaking images of microscopic worlds
Delila Ledwith - Dec 16, 2014
This year's BioScapes winner is a breakthrough video showing fruit fly embryos as they emerge from a mass of trembling cells.
 
Bill Nye uses emojis to explain evolution
Joseph Scalise - Dec 16, 2014
The goal was to help people better understand evolution and its importance.
 
Massive study gives in-depth look at Greenland's loss of ice
James Sullivan - Dec 16, 2014
The new study demonstrates that, in fact, certain areas actually thicken with ice due to increasing temperatures
 
Experts make last-ditch effort to save white rhinos
James Sullivan - Dec 16, 2014
The latest plan is to extract eggs from Nabire, a 31-year-old female, living in the Dvur Kralove Zoo of the Czech Republic and fertilize them in vitro with rhino sperm.
 
U.S. military looking into direction-changing bullets
Joseph Scalise - Dec 16, 2014
In pursuit of greater sniper accuracy, the U.S. military is developing bullets that can change direction in midair.
 
Scientists crack the genetic code on horse domestication over the last 5,500 years
Dan Taylor - Dec 16, 2014
Scientists made the discovery despite the fact that studying horse genetics is difficult, as only one wild population of horses still exists on the planet.
 
Scientists develop 'fraud-poof' credit card by manipulating photons
Angelo Sayo - Dec 15, 2014
Researchers from the Netherlands have developed quantum-secure authentication that utilizes quantum mechanics to help prevent false authentication in credit card frauds and identity thefts.
 
Study finds that a now-extinct species helped man domesticate horses
Angelo Sayo - Dec 15, 2014
Whole genome sequencing from an international team of researchers is used to characterize the genetic footprints of domestication in horses.
 
Denmark asserts sovereignty over North Pole to exploit energy resources
Delila Ledwith - Dec 15, 2014
Denmark and other Arctic nations compete for a region believed to contain 30 percent of the world's undiscovered natural gas.
 
U.S. military developing bullets that can change direction in midair
Delila Ledwith - Dec 15, 2014
The military's new direction-changing bullet could be useful places like Afghanistan where high winds are a problem.
 
Humpback whale sightings at an all time high in New York
James Sullivan - Dec 15, 2014
About 11,600 are thought to reside in the Western North Atlantic, due to the success of international whaling laws.
 
Alternate theory suggests volcanic eruption led to dinosaur extinction
Joseph Scalise - Dec 15, 2014
New evidence gathered from dating the Deccan Traps in India, suggests that a massive volcanic eruption may have directly contributed to the extinction of the dinosaurs.
 
New contracts help DOD advance supercomputing power
Joseph Scalise - Dec 15, 2014
The Department of Defense has just been awarded two new supercomputing contracts, which will help them keep up in the worldwide race for advanced technology.
 
Virgin's deep sea submarine project shelved
James Sullivan - Dec 15, 2014
The effort has been over three years in the making.
 
Paul Revere time capsule found after more than two hundred years
Delila Ledwith - Dec 14, 2014
The contents of a time capsule buried by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams in 1795 may be revealed next week.
 
CERN to relaunch Large Hadron Collider by March 2015
Angelo Sayo - Dec 14, 2014
CERN recently announced that its Large Hadron Collider will be gearing up for its second run, set to be circulating proton beams by March 2015.
 
Water discovered on Comet 67P re-fuels debate on origin of Earth's oceans
Delila Ledwith - Dec 14, 2014
Earth's water likely was delivered by asteroids, not comets, scientists say.
 
Entangles humpback whale is freed by humans
Chiamaka Nwakeze - Dec 14, 2014
In 1966, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) placed the humpback whale in protected status in order to decrease the large-scale, but often-illegal killing of these marine mammals. Much of these policies were successful; however,r others required the presence of a basketball team.
 
Humpback whale population returns to New York City
Angelo Sayo - Dec 14, 2014
New data shows that in 2014, 106 humpback whales have been spotted in New York City waters, a significant improvement from past years.
 
How did birds lose their teeth? Scientists solve vexing mystery
Dan Taylor - Dec 14, 2014
The evidence points to a genetic mutation that made tooth-creating genes inactive in a common ancestor that lived 116 million years ago.
 
Losing just a few pounds greatly increases the chances of breast cancer survival, study finds
Dan Taylor - Dec 13, 2014
Scientists studied 2,400 during the study, which took two decades to complete, and found dramatic differences between those who lost weight and those who did not.
 
Atlas V rocket blasts off from Air Force base carrying top-secret satellite
Dan Taylor - Dec 13, 2014
The launch was planned for Thursday, but was delayed a day due to a storm that slammed the state of California.
 
Minnesota fog traps air pollution particles
James Sullivan - Dec 12, 2014
The warning is in effect until the end of Sunday.
 
Strange new deep sea worm discovered in Monterey Bay
James Sullivan - Dec 12, 2014
Greg Rouse from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography discovered the new annelid 3,000 feet below the ocean, where they occupied the carcass of a drowned seal.
 
Space company's new program will allow people to send personal trinkets to the moon
Joseph Scalise - Dec 12, 2014
MoonMail, a new program from Astrobiotic Technology, will allow people to send their personal keepsakes to the surface of the moon.
 
New Navy spy fish resembles blue fin tuna
Joseph Scalise - Dec 12, 2014
In order to swim undetected in international waters, the Navy program, Project Silent Nemo has successfully created a robot that resembles a fish.
 
Dark matter spotted for the first time ever, scientists say in stunning find
Dan Taylor - Dec 12, 2014
The find could mark the beginning of a new era in astronomy, and lead to the creation of telescopes designed specifically to observe dark matter.
 
Wreckage uncovered of 1901 ship that sank 10 minutes after departure
Delila Ledwith - Dec 12, 2014
Scientists have found the SS Rio de Janeiro, known as the Titanic of the Golden Gate, which sank in San Francisco Bay waters in 1901.