Reducing carbon emissions pays for itself, researchers say
Reducing carbon emissions pays for itself, researchers say
Researchers examined in contrast the health benefits of three climate policies and the economic costs of the policies.
Global warming has ended? Scientists warn
Global warming has ended? Scientists warn "Not so fast."
A new report suggests that missing atmospheric heat is stored in the deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean.
Curiosity rover targets fourth rock for sample drilling
Curiosity rover targets fourth rock for sample drilling
Mount Sharp is the mission's long-term science destination.
Astronomers measure rare black hole
Astronomers measure rare black hole
The black hole is approximately 400 times the mass of our sun in a galaxy 12 million light years from Earth.
UN document states that climate change is man-made, and potentially highly dangerous
Joe Chivers - 1 hour ago
The report is an amalgamation of three previous documents, and paints a clearer picture of the daunting future potentially facing humanity.
 
NASA wants to unleash robot 'Swarmies' on alien worlds
James Sullivan - 5 hours ago
In the near future, engineers hope that these robots will be able to scan Martian soil for signs of water.
 
Are we living in a 2-D hologram? Fermilab aims to find out
Jonathan Marker - 6 hours ago
Researchers say that the information about everything in our universe could in fact be encoded in tiny packets in two dimensions.
 
Best view yet of distant colliding galaxies
Jonathan Marker - 11 hours ago
The researchers used a galaxy-sized magnifying glass – the galaxy H-ATLAS J142935.3-002836 - to reveal otherwise invisible detail.
 
Counseling seen as solution for overweight Americans with heart risks
Ross Cronkrite - 12 hours ago
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S.
 
Near-complete skeleton of mammoth discovered by North Texas family
Joe Chivers - 19 hours ago
Members of the McEwen family were digging a gravel pit on their ranch in Ellis County, just south of Dallas, when they made the discovery.
 
Another reason to stay inside: breed of fish-eating spider invades Wisconsin
Kristy Blackmon - 20 hours ago
Fishing-spiders can walk and run on water in pursuit of small fish, tadpoles and slugs.
 
New submarine technology may allow for supersonic travel
Kristy Blackmon - 20 hours ago
Chinese scientists are developing technology that would cut trips from Shanghai to San Francisco to 100 minutes.
 
Iceland volcano continues to shake ground in possible prelude to coming eruption
Delila Ledwith - 21 hours ago
A subglacial volcano in Iceland is causing hundreds of seismic events and could erupt at any time.
 
Three-million-year-old child skull had no soft spot
Jonathan Marker - Aug 26, 2014
The Taung Child has historical and scientific importance in the fossil record as the first and best example of early hominin brain evolution.
 
Major milestone: NASA's Pluto-bound spacecraft crosses Neptune's orbit
James Sullivan - Aug 25, 2014
New Horizons is expected to reach the dwarf planet on July 14, 2015.
 
U.S. Army destroys hypersonic test vehicle after launch failure
Delila Ledwith - Aug 25, 2014
The Army's new hypersonic test vehicle self-destructs after launch goes awry.
 
2,700-year-old Phoenician shipwreck near Malta yields oldest artifacts
Delila Ledwith - Aug 25, 2014
Scientists study ancient artifacts from a sunken 2,700-year-old Phoenician vessel, saying it could be the oldest shipwreck ever found in the Mediterranean.
 
New genome study finds honeybees originated from Asia, not Africa
Jonathan Marker - Aug 25, 2014
The honeybee is of vital importance for humanity, as one-third of the food we eat is dependent on the pollination of fruits, nuts and vegetables by bees and other insects.
 
Reducing carbon emissions pays for itself, researchers say
Ross Cronkrite - Aug 25, 2014
Researchers examined in contrast the health benefits of three climate policies and the economic costs of the policies.
 
Researchers: Sunlight, not bacteria, key to CO2 in Arctic
James Sullivan - Aug 24, 2014
It turns out, that in Arctic rivers and lakes, sunlight is faster than bacteria at turning organic carbon into CO2.
 
Rats to board ISS for scientific research
James Sullivan - Aug 24, 2014
This is hardly the first time that rodents have been flown into orbit.
 
Oldest known metal object in Middle East found in woman's grave
Ross Cronkrite - Aug 24, 2014
esearchers have also unearthed roasting ovens filled with animal bones, figurines of people and animals, as well as incredibly unique pottery.
 
Volcano activity begins in Iceland
Chiamaka Nwakeze - Aug 24, 2014
According to the Icelandic Meterological Office (MET), the country's biggest volcanoes have shown recent unrest and on Saturday, August 23, the organization announced that "small subglacial lava-eruption has begun under the Dyngjujokull glacier."
 
Global warming has ended? Scientists warn "Not so fast."
Chiamaka Nwakeze - Aug 23, 2014
A new report suggests that missing atmospheric heat is stored in the deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean.
 
Evidence of one of the Universe's first stars detected
Jonathan Marker - Aug 22, 2014
Numerical simulations have made significant progress in understanding the formation of the first stars.
 
Urban heat islands pose serious threat to health of city-dwellers
Delila Ledwith - Aug 22, 2014
Urban heat islands can make cities nearly 30 degrees hotter than surrounding rural areas.
 
Fish can smell a bad coral reef, researchers say
Jonathan Marker - Aug 22, 2014
Some degraded reefs may have to be managed so that they produce the signals that attract new fish and coral larvae.
 
California landscape rising due to loss of groundwater, GPS records show
Delila Ledwith - Aug 22, 2014
The severe drought in California is literally changing its landscape, researchers say.
 
Atlantic Ocean current could be responsible for slowing global temperature increase
Joe Chivers - Aug 21, 2014
Since 1999, a very peculiar phenomenon has been occurring – despite carbon dioxide levels rising, the earth's temperature has not.
 
Sunblock lotion poses threat to marine life, new study says
Delila Ledwith - Aug 21, 2014
Sunblock may have deadly consequences for aquatic life, according to a new study.
 
Scientists discover earliest evidence of snail-eating
Jonathan Marker - Aug 21, 2014
Although snails occurred frequently throughout the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, it is still not known when and how they were integrated into human diets.
 
Neanderthals and humans may have had sex for thousands of years
Jonathan Marker - Aug 21, 2014
Currently, there is no evidence to show that Neanderthals and early modern humans lived closely together.
 
Life confirmed under Antarctic ice
James Sullivan - Aug 21, 2014
A recent sampling made by microbiologists working in the region yielded nearly 4,000 different species of microbes that inhabit Lake Whillans.
 
Peanut butter recalled for salmonella risk
Lea Clay - Aug 21, 2014
Approximately 1.2 million illnesss, 23,000 hospitalizations and 450 deaths in the U.S. occur each year due to salmonella.
 
Curiosity rover spots strange bone-like object on Mars
James Sullivan - Aug 21, 2014
Even for a casual observer, the unusual structure resembles a thigh bone.
 
Researchers: Zombie ant fungus kills hosts at their 'doorstep'
Jonathan Marker - Aug 21, 2014
The researchers suggest that the parasite functions as a long lasting, though tolerable, condition for the ants.
 
Surprise: Spiders thrive better in urban environments, researchers say
Delila Ledwith - Aug 20, 2014
City-dwelling spiders fare better than those living in natural habitats, a new study says.
 
Vultures 'more threatened than rhinos,' conservationists warn following mass poisoning
Joe Chivers - Aug 20, 2014
Vultures are regularly the victim of poisoning by poachers, who fear that the sight of the birds flying above their kill will draw the attention of rangers.
 
Researchers create transparent solar energy concentrator
Joe Chivers - Aug 20, 2014
Researchers from Michigan State University have created a solar concentrator made from transparent plastic, with potential for use on buildings, cell phones, and more.
 
Researchers create cybernetic moth capable of being controlled remotely
Joe Chivers - Aug 20, 2014
The long-term goal is to potentially enable the use of moths as "biobots", which could be used to aid in search and rescue operations.
 
Dolphin adopts member of a different species
James Sullivan - Aug 20, 2014
Marine biologists have nicknamed the baby dolphin "Pee-Wee."
 
Stunning new photo reveals spectacular landscape of star formation
Jonathan Marker - Aug 20, 2014
Sir John Herschel first discovered the nebula in 1834.
 
Fukishima meltdown in 2011 causing significant genetic damage in animals and plants
Delila Ledwith - Aug 20, 2014
Genetic damage and mutations in plants and animals are the legacy of the Fukushima meltdown, scientists say.
 
Amazing high-speed video captures jellyfish's fearsome sting
Delila Ledwith - Aug 20, 2014
New YouTube video captures deadly jellyfish sting with high-speed camera.